Marine


Indigenous rangers protecting turtles
ABC Rural, 24 December 2013

QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA: There is little known about the flat back turtles that nest on the beaches of north Queensland, or the threats they face. But a group of indigenous rangers is working to protect the creatures by patrolling the beaches and the ocean. Mixing traditional knowledge and modern science, the rangers are making sure the extraordinary species will survive into the future, and be around for the next generation. Read the article …

Following tradition: Top examples of indigenous knowledge preserving biodiversity, ecosystem services
Phys.org, 9 December 2013

ANTALYA, TURKEY: With the planet losing species 100 to 1,000 times faster than the natural extinction rate, international experts assembling for high-level global biodiversity meetings say knowledge co-production with indigenous peoples has growing importance. Building synergies between science and traditional knowledge forms one focus of delegates meeting in Antalya, Turkey, from 9-14 December, charged with determining a conceptual framework and initial work program for the UN’s new Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Available from almost every world region, lessons for ecosystem and natural resource management in indigenous and local knowledge include: the rice-fish co-culture, a farming technique for over 1,200 years in south China, which was recently designated a “globally-important agricultural heritage system” by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization; indigenous fire management techniques developed thousands of years ago, used to protect large landscapes in Australia, Indonesia, Japan and Venezuela; animal herd management in the Arctic, where remote satellite sensing, meteorology and modelling are complemented with the indigenous knowledge of Sami and Nenets reindeer herders to co-produce datasets; rotational farming, traditional cropping strategies and access to seeds, which have proved essential for adaptation and survival; sophisticated rainwater harvesting techniques; and sustainable management of marine resources, as practiced by many Pacific island communities, which traditionally involves the use of area and time-based restrictions to facilitate marine resource recovery. Read the release … Read a related article on Reuters … Follow the IISD Reporting Services coverage of IPBES-2 …

Implementing Improved Tenure Governance in Fisheries: A Technical Guide to Support the Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security
FAO, preliminary version, September 2013

This guide has been developed to assist in the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines with regard to fisheries in marine and inland waters. It explains the characteristics of the fisheries sector and provides technical guidance, aiming to contribute to the improvement of governance of tenure in fisheries. Special attention is given to small-scale fisheries, considering the sector’s particular importance to food security and nutrition, poverty eradication, equitable development and sustainable resource utilization. Part 1 of the Guide provides explanations with regard to important concepts for understanding tenure in fisheries, including tenure rights, customary and informal tenure systems, and a human rights approach in small-scale fisheries governance and development. Part 2 discusses approaches for how to implement responsible tenure in fisheries and is directed to those who are tasked with implementing the Guidelines in the fisheries sector and for the benefit of small-scale fishing communities. The Guide focuses in particular on issues of concern with regard to tenure in the context of livelihoods of vulnerable and marginalized groups. Download the Guide [pdf] …

Land Tenure Journal
FAO, September 2013

This issue of Land Tenure Journal focuses on governance of tenure in small-scale fisheries. In addition to an article by Anthony Charles on key considerations, it includes case studies from Southeast Asia, Lake Victoria in Tanzania, the Sami in Norway, South Africa and Grenada. The case of tenure rights of fishing communities in marine protected areas is also addressed. Download the issue [pdf] …

Science and tradition secure a fishier future for Fiji
Phys.org, 15 October 2013

KUBULAU DISTRICT, FIJI: In a world where fish catches are collapsing around the globe, Fijian fish are on the comeback trail thanks to a remarkable blend of centuries-old tradition and the latest science. In Kubulau District, local fishers, marine biologists and staff of the Wildlife Conservation Society are combining ancient tabu (taboo) customs and modern science to manage fish stocks. The communities of Kubulau have extended their network of marine protected areas (MPAs) to cover almost half their traditional fisheries area using a mix of traditional and “western” management styles. “The practice of establishing a tabu – which places temporary bans on fishing in certain areas – goes back hundreds of years in Fijian history,” says Dr Rebecca Weeks from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Australia. “By working together to create a network of tabu areas, and adding some large, permanently closed MPAs, the communities in Kubulau are making sure that their management efforts are better able to address the problem of sustainable fishing in the 21st century. Read the article …

Fourth Global Conference of the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative
12-14 September 2013 (Fukui, Japan)

IPSI-4, entitled ‘The Way Forward: Implementing the IPSI Strategy for the Benefit of Biodiversity and Human Well-being’, will be held at Fukui, Japan on 12-14 September 2013. The Conference is composed of the IPSI Assembly (IPSI members only), Public Forum (open to all interested participants, and a Public Symposium that Fukui Prefectural Government is organizing to facilitate the full engagement of local citizens and stakeholders. The Public Forum will focus on challenges and opportunities for socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes from local perspectives. It is recalled that the Satoyama Initiative aims at conserving human-influenced natural environments that people have developed and maintained sustainably over a long time, as well as the sustainable practices and knowledge they represent. Read the Conference announcement … Visit the website of the Satoyama Initiative …

Universities to document fishermen’s knowledge
The Times of India, 30 July 2013

KOCHI, INDIA: Eight hours before the tsunami hit the shores in 2004, fishermen in the coastal areas had sent across a message that the sea would come in. It was the elderly fishermen in the area who gave the warning listening to the sounds from the sea and the behaviour of animals in the water and on the land. But, for want of any scientific explanation, the warning fell on deaf ears. Realizing that this knowledge acquired by experience could be lost if not documented, the Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies (Kufos) and Cochin University of Science and Technology (Cusat) have initiated projects to document the vast traditional knowledge. Read the article …

Indigenous land managers to help with turtles, dugongs conservation
ABC Message Stick, 18 July 2013

NORTHERN QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA: Australia’s Federal Government has given $1 million towards the conservation of sea turtles and dugongs in northern Queensland. The money will be split between eight groups in the region for them to maintain marine environments and raise community awareness about the species. Federal Environment Minister Mark Butler said it is important to use the generations of local knowledge, adding that the indigenous land managers understand the topography and the habits of dugongs, sea turtles and other endangered species in the area that they have been sustainably harvesting for literally hundreds of generations. Read the article …

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