Implementing Declaration on Indigenous Rights Will Be Difficult or Impossible Without Greater Awareness of Human Rights Values, Third Committee Told
UN release, 21 October 2013

UN HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK: Addressing UN General Assembly’s (UNGA) Third Committee discussions of social, humanitarian and cultural issues on 21 October 2013, James Anaya, Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, presented his final report and briefed Member States on activities undertaken during his time of service. He said he gave particular emphasis to building constructive dialogue between indigenous peoples and others, particularly on human rights issues and extractive industries operating in or near indigenous peoples’ territories. He expressed concern that UNDRIP is often seen as being non-binding and aspirational in nature, saying that “States should aspire to implement it.” UN representatives and several delegates stressed that greater awareness of human rights should underpin a renewed push for implementation. A message from Wu Hongbo, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs and Coordinator of the Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, called for greater attention to the situation of indigenous women, who face “triple discrimination” on the basis of their indigenous identity, gender and economic status.

Among the report’s recommendations, it is stated that there is an urgent need for greater awareness about the human rights values and concerns represented by UNDRIP and about the standards that are articulated in the Declaration to address those concerns; and that greater efforts must be put in place to achieve such broad awareness among governmental and other influential actors, the international system, and the general public. Read the release … Download the UN Special Rapporteur’s report (A/68/317)[pdf] …

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